Assessment

Assessment is an integral part of effective teaching. Assessment should to be valid, reliable and sensitive, and should be used to decide on next steps in teaching and learning. 

Training in assessment of reading difficulties

 

Assessment

Teaching Reading is Rocket Science (Moats L 1999) American Federation of Teachers from louisamoats.com website

A clearly structured and thorough account of what teachers need to know about language, reading development and teaching methods in order to ensure that all of their students learn to read well. Clear indications of what teachers should assess for, and what students should be able to do at various stages, make this a very practical outline. The title encapsulates the central idea, that the body of knowledge required to teach reading is “extensive, hidden and complex.”

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Literacy assessment based upon the National Reading Panel's Big Five Components (Hempenstall K 2009) Updated version of Research-driven reading assessment: Drilling to the core from Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties 14(1) 17-52 retrieved from nifdi.org

Kerry Hempenstall provides detailed, thorough commentary on research and issues surrounding the effective assessment of the “big five” reading components. He surveys a wide range of tests and systems which can be used to guide teaching decisions.

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Differentiated Curricula and Assessment in Reading Instruction (Kame'enui, E undated) Children of the Code

Ed Kame’enui discusses in-depth the key requirements for ensuring early success in reading for all students, drawing on extensive and detailed research to support a case for high-quality curriculum design and teacher practice.

Differentiated Curricula and Assessment in Reading Instruction 

 
DIBELS: Myths and Facts (Kaminski R and Cummings K D 2007) Dynamic Measurement Group retrieved from dibels.org

A highly informative article about the purpose, design and proper use of DIBELS assessments. Misconceptions about the DIBELS system are comprehensively addressed.

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Technical Adequacy of DIBELS: results of the Early Childhood Research Institute on measuring growth and development (Good R, Kaminski R, Shinn M, Bratten J, Shinn M, Laimon D, Smith S and Flindt N 2004) University of Oregon

A technical report on the reliability of DIBELS tests for literacy skills in early primary education. 

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Assessment (Clarke A undated) retrieved from spelfabet.com

An excellent survey of assessments available for reading, spelling and phonemic awareness.

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Book Levelling (Madelaine A Macquarie University Special Education Centre 2007) MUSEC Briefings: Issue 13

A short summary of the practice of systematic book levelling to assist matching instructional materials to students’ current levels of achievement. The area is not well researched, but ‘promising’.

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Theory of Instruction (Carnine D and Engelmann S 1991) ADI Press

Painstakingly researched and field-tested, the principles in this book form the basis not only for Direct Instruction programmes but for any instructional design that teachers want to be efficient, powerful and long-lasting. As one reviewer put it: “The art of instruction is becoming a technology. One hundred years from now smart people will be teaching with Engelmann's methods. The chaff in current theory will be gone and student performance will be so advanced you won't know it by today's standards.”  (This links to Amazon, not the book itself.)

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Exceptional Teaching for Exceptional Children (White O R and Haring N G 1980) Charles Merrill

Although not easy to obtain, this comprehensive text provides a host of lucidly organised information on ways of addressing even the most profound learning difficulties. Beneath all this practice lies a clear ethical framework that values people regardless of their abilities or disabilities. (NB This link takes you to Amazon, not the book itself.)

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Training in assessment of reading difficulties