Direct Instruction

 

Direct Instruction is a rigorously tested, well-supported set of teaching strategies. It is known, amongst other things, for its power to overcome the "achievement gap".

Direct Instruction - a key principle of Thinking Reading

 

Direct Instruction

Clear Teaching (Shepard Barbash 2012): Education Consumers Foundation 

This short book effectively outlines the development of Direct Instruction, its core principles, what it looks like in practice and how it is supported by a large body of evidence.

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What is Direct Instruction? (from Exceptional Children: an introduction to special education) (Heward W L 2000) Retrieved from wps.prenhall.com

A short, lucid and salient description of Direct Instruction, what it isn’t and what makes it effective. 

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Direct Instruction is Applied Philosophy (Kozloff, M 2004): ADI News

Martin Kozloff explains the roots of Direct Instruction and shows how it is built upon a system of logic. One of the key assumptions of Direct Instruction is that learners are essentially logical and can learn anything if it is presented so that only one interpretation is possible.

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Engelmann’s Theory of Instruction: Athabasca University

A succinct and crystal-clear outline of the principles of Direct Instruction. Start your in-depth study of DI here.

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Critique of lowercased d i (direct instruction)

Zig Engelmann analyses the origins of the terms in modern education and considers the teacher training problems inherent in using (lowercase) direct instruction.

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Middle-Class Follow Through Students (Siegfried Engelmann 2012): Zig Site

Zig Engelmann dispels the myth that Direct Instruction is only useful for poor children. While it undoubtedly accelerates achievement amongst working class students, DI proved even more effective with middle class students. Class and affluence are no excuse for depriving children of effective teaching methods.

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Direct Instruction in Education (Kozloff M A, LaNunziata L, Cowardin J 1999) 

This lucid article explains the philosophical and practical advantages of ‘instructivist’ education, and highlights the power of Direct Instruction as an excellent example of well-designed teaching procedures and curricula.

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DI is Developmentally Appropriate (Kozloff M A, Bessellieu F B 2000) : University of North Carolina at Wilmington

This article considers various statements by educationalists about what constitutes developmentally appropriate practice, and shows how Direct Instruction programmes incorporate these principles. The article gives helpful indications of the purpose and features of various DI programmes.

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Follow Through: Why Didn’t We? (Watkins, C L 1995): University of Oregon

The story of Project Follow Through makes for extraordinary reading. Despite the fact that Direct Instruction out-performed every other intervention evaluated on every measure, education officials refused to endorse the findings of their own report or to apply them to American education. Watkins’ article highlights the ways in which ideology and politics often trump sound evidence.

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Follow-Up of Follow Through: the Later Effects of the Direct Instruction Model on Children in Fifth and Sixth Grades (Becker C H and Gersten R 2001) Journal of Direct Instruction 1: 1
Three years after Project Follow Through, Wes Becker followed up a large sample of students to evaluate the longer term impact of Direct Instruction. The strongest findings showed lasting gains in word decoding, spelling and maths computation. Becker discusses a range of research problems that had to be overcome in order to conduct this study.
 
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Research on Direct Instruction: 25 years beyond DISTAR - Chapter 3 Myths about Direct Instruction (Adams G and Engelmann S 1996)

The authors confront the misinformation that is peddled about Direct Instruction, and oint to the evidence that supports a carefully structured curriculum taught in a warm, safe environment.

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Special Education and Direct Instruction: an effective combination (Kinder D, Kubina R and Marchand-Martell N E 2005) SRA Retrieved from mheresearch.com

SRA publish Direct Instruction materials. Here is their view of how the research supports the use of Direct Instruction programmes with students with special educational needs.

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Myths About Direct Instruction and Research That Refutes Those Myths (Tarver S: undated) : University of Wisconsin

A short summary challenging the main myths and misconceptions about Direct Instruction.

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Myths and Truths About Direct Instruction (Tarver S G 1998): Effective School Practices

A more detailed discussion of the myths and misrepresentations that are actively promoted about Direct Instruction. Tarver refutes these claims and questions why educators refuse to acknowledge successful teaching methods.

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The Myths and Facts About Direct Instruction (Killian S 2014) Pinnacle Education

As soon as Direct Instruction begins to have an effect, objectors appear in the media. In Australia, politicians admired the impact of DI with poorer, disadvantaged communities with predictable results. This article answers the misleading claims made about the programme by its opponents.

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Direct Instruction - a key principle of Thinking Reading